Creativity and the future of skills

At a time when all jobs, whether in a coffee shop or a bank, can seemingly be described as creative, you’d be forgiven for thinking the word had lost all meaning in the labour market.1 If this is the case, then what does that mean for the ‘Creative Industries’, a sector defined by employment of creative talent?2 In order to understand how the word ‘creativity’ is really being used in the job market, and whether its importance will lessen or grow, we look at 35 million UK job adverts from 2013-2017 inclusive, and the relative importance of the word ‘creativity’ within them (both frequency of use within the adverts, and proportion of adverts using the word). The data are sourced from Burning Glass Technologies.

At a time when all jobs, whether in a coffee shop or a bank, can seemingly be described as creative, you’d be forgiven for thinking the word had lost all meaning in the labour market.1 If this is the case, then what does that mean for the ‘Creative Industries’, a sector defined by employment of creative talent?2 In order to understand how the word ‘creativity’ is really being used in the job market, and whether its importance will lessen or grow, we look at 35 million UK job adverts from 2013-2017 inclusive, and the relative importance of the word ‘creativity’ within them (both frequency of use within the adverts, and proportion of adverts using the word). The data are sourced from Burning Glass Technologies.

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Categories: Education and Skills
Tags: Creative PEC
Creativity and the Future of Skills
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